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Welcome to NYC School of Data — a community conference that demystifies the policies and practices around civic data, technology, and service design. This year’s conference concludes NYC’s annual Open Data Week & features 60+ sessions organized by NYC’s civic technology, data, and design community! Our conversations & workshops will feed your mind and empower you to improve your neighborhood. Follow the conversation #nycSOdata on twitter and tune into our live stream (provided by the Internet Society New York Chapter).

To attend, you need to purchase tickets via eventbrite. Venue is fully accessible and content is all ages friendly — free, professional on-site childcare is provided for ALL participants! If you have accessibility questions or needs, please email us at < schoolofdata@beta.nyc >.

View Sessions by detail - room - grid. If you have any questions, please see our welcome to 2020 post or FAQ.

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Workshop [clear filter]
Saturday, March 7
 

11:30am EST

Developing in the open & rebuilding PLUTO

NYC Planning’s Data Engineering team is transforming the way we think about Open Data in government by opening up the processes behind making public datasets.  As data engineers we develop new data products and modernize the creation of existing datasets, such as PLUTO, which is NYC’s definitive tax lot dataset that contains over 800k rows and 87 columns capturing lot level, building level, and geospatial attributes sourced from a dozen input data sources.  During this talk we’ll show how we re-engineered PLUTO and made sure that the data matched previous versions, discuss why it is important to us that the code to build PLUTO is available on GitHub, and describe where we’re going next, as an example of the type of work that we do.

Though, we’re not just excited about the data products we build, we’re equally passionate about how we build them.  In the later portion of the talk we’ll do a deep dive into a couple of the core technologies we use that enable us to iteratively integrate improvements, distribute our maintenance responsibilities, and generate products efficiently.


Speakers
avatar for Amanda Doyle

Amanda Doyle

Team lead, data engineering, NYC Planning
PLUTO and open datasets created by NYC Planning.
BC

Baiyue Cao

NYC Planning
BZ

Baoling Zhou

NYC Planning



Saturday March 7, 2020 11:30am - 12:30pm EST
3-302 - (60 ppl)

11:30am EST

Environmental advocacy meets emerging technology: A bottom-up approach to smart city projects
How can community-based organizations leverage the power of technology for environmental data collection? Our talk will take a deep dive into Temboo and Gowanus Canal Conservancy’s project that links community activism, non-profit advocacy, government funding, and no-code technology —all to address climate change at a hyper-local scale in Brooklyn.
This overview will provide insight into how the Gowanus Canal Conservancy and their volunteers used Temboo’s no-code technology to collect soil moisture data from street trees. By placing people at the center of the Internet of Things, Temboo’s  platform enables NGOs and volunteers to have ownership over their projects, allowing them to easily collect, understand, and share data. The project also leverages existing data sets from NYC Open Data and NYC’s Street Tree Map, the world’s most accurate and detailed map of a city’s street tree network. Finally, this presentation will  showcase how inclusive technology can empower residents to connect with their environment, prompt civic engagement, share valuable information, and solve problems together.

Speakers
avatar for Briana Garcia

Briana Garcia

Temboo
I am interested in collaborating with multi-stakeholders in the public, private, and civil sectors to find an inclusive, scalable solution with IoT technology - be it in the water management, air quality, and or blue/green infrastructure space.
VS

Vaughn Shinall

Head of Project Outreach, Temboo


Saturday March 7, 2020 11:30am - 12:30pm EST
2-116 - (30 ppl)

11:30am EST

Modernize Community Engagement (Part 1): Leverage Location Data in Interactive Maps, Smart Data Collection Apps, and Live Reporting Dashboards (Presentation)
ArcGIS is a comprehensive data management, visualization, and analytics platform that can support end-to-end civic engagement and community development efforts.

ArcGIS goes beyond mapping to provide built-in data collection and real-time reporting and analytics capabilities through its suite of configurable surveying, dashboarding, and storytelling apps which are easy to use, quick to set up, and require NO CODING to get started. Everything presented is available to everyone at no cost.

In this session, attendees will learn:
  • Exploring and visualizing Open Data to create a data collection project;
  • How to quickly and accurately collect data in the field with logic-based smart forms;
  • How to conduct real-time survey reporting through dynamic dashboards;
  • And how to support consistent and compelling constituent engagement through modern, mobile-responsive storytelling apps.

Session attendees should create a FREE ArcGIS Developer account at https://developers.arcgis.com if they would like to participate in hands-on exercises during the presentation.



Speakers
avatar for Paul Trevillion

Paul Trevillion

Instructor, Esri
Hi all! I\\'m a member of Esri\\'s Education Services team, as well as our Esri New York City team. I teach advanced GIS courses, primarily those in the realm of Web GIS, plus courses in Land Records and Utility Networks management. I received a BA in Geography from the University... Read More →
avatar for Piyali Kundu

Piyali Kundu

Solution Engineer, Esri
Piyali Kundu is a Solutions Engineer based out of Esri\\'s New York City office. She works daily with enterprise clients and communities to implement next-generation solutions that leverage advanced geospatial technology to solve complex business problems. She specializes in developing... Read More →



Saturday March 7, 2020 11:30am - 12:30pm EST
3-114 - (48 ppl)

11:30am EST

How to improve NYC's Board of Election data
In the first part of the session, we will explore Crosstown, a new application to make historical election results data from the NYC Board of Elections easier to analyze. NYCBOE data is currently siloed and is difficult to use to compare vote counts from different elections and different years. Crosstown is intended to be useful for voters, candidates, and campaign staff/volunteers by providing data visualizations -- including a map of the city broken down by borough, Assembly District, and Election District -- that make our complex elections system easier to understand.

In the second part, we will brainstorm about additional uses for NYCBOE data in order to propose a format for an election results dataset that could live on the NYC Open Data portal. Depending on the interest/skills of the audience, we may use our time to develop a proposal to the NYCBOE to build and publish that dataset.

Speakers
avatar for Alec Barrett

Alec Barrett

Democratic District Leader
Alec is the lead developer at TWO-N, a boutique data visualization studio. He is also a member of Manhattan Community Board 9 and regular student at trainings by BetaNYC and the Manhattan Borough President's Office. He is an alum of the Recurse Center.


Saturday March 7, 2020 11:30am - 12:30pm EST
2-113 - (14 ppl)

11:30am EST

Vacant Storefront App w/ Astoria Tech
Astoria Tech recently launched the Location Wishlist app (https://vacant.astoria.app), a tool to gather community input on what businesses / storefronts they'd like to see open up at specific vacant locations. It works as follows:

  • Anyone in the community submits a vacant storefront (with photo)
  • That location gets a unique URL, which we print out a QR code sticker for
  • We post the sticker near the vacant storefront
  • People scan the QR code and submit/vote on what they wish would open there

On top of gathering community opinions which aren't being gathered anywhere else, the app (and all Astoria Tech content) was developed completely by volunteer engineers from the Astoria Tech Group. We coordinate online and have a monthly hack day to plan out next steps and get work done/started.

A few core contributors to the project will go over the specific trials and lessons from developing this app, the immediate goals and hopes for the app, and the overall community project vision for Astoria Tech.

Speakers
avatar for Peter Valdez

Peter Valdez

Community Engineer, Astoria Tech
avatar for Blane Cordes

Blane Cordes

Organizer, Astoria Tech
Hi There, I\\'m Blane an engineer living in Astoria. We started a tech community here and have been building some fun apps for the neighborhood.


Saturday March 7, 2020 11:30am - 12:30pm EST
2-115 - (14 ppl)

12:30pm EST

Modernize Community Engagement (Part 2): Build Your Own Smart Data Collection Apps, Live Dashboards, and Interactive Presentation Maps (Lunch + Workshop)
(This is a companion to the previous session. For attendants, lunch will be served in this room.)

ArcGIS is a comprehensive data management, visualization, and analytics platform that can support end-to-end civic engagement and community development efforts.

ArcGIS goes beyond mapping to provide built-in data collection and real-time reporting and analytics capabilities through its suite of configurable surveying, dashboarding, and storytelling apps which are easy to use, quick to set up, and require NO CODING to get started. Everything presented is available to everyone at no cost.

In this session, attendees will learn:
  • Exploring and visualizing Open Data to create a data collection project;
  • How to quickly and accurately collect data in the field with logic-based smart forms;
  • How to conduct real-time survey reporting through dynamic dashboards;
  • And how to support consistent and compelling constituent engagement through modern, mobile-responsive storytelling apps.

Session attendees should create a FREE ArcGIS Developer account at https://developers.arcgis.com if they would like to participate in hands-on exercises during the presentation.



Speakers
avatar for Paul Trevillion

Paul Trevillion

Instructor, Esri
Hi all! I\\'m a member of Esri\\'s Education Services team, as well as our Esri New York City team. I teach advanced GIS courses, primarily those in the realm of Web GIS, plus courses in Land Records and Utility Networks management. I received a BA in Geography from the University... Read More →
avatar for Piyali Kundu

Piyali Kundu

Solution Engineer, Esri
Piyali Kundu is a Solutions Engineer based out of Esri\\'s New York City office. She works daily with enterprise clients and communities to implement next-generation solutions that leverage advanced geospatial technology to solve complex business problems. She specializes in developing... Read More →



Saturday March 7, 2020 12:30pm - 1:30pm EST
3-114 - (48 ppl)

1:45pm EST

Advancing Digital Transparency in the Public Realm - Report Back and Workshop with Sidewalk labs
Last year at the School of Data NYC, we ran a co-design session that provided inputs into open-source design patterns and tools to imagine how we might increase digital transparency in the public realm.

For this year’s workshop, we will report back on the designs that were created and released, and share an update on the current round of prototyping that seeks to move beyond the starting point of transparency towards accountability in the way digital technologies are incorporated into the places we live - for more info see < https://process.dtpr.dev >.

During the session, participants will provide feedback on the DTPR system to inform the direction of the project and improve the prototypes, helping advance a conversation on what digital transparency, accountability, and trust in the built environment could look like.

NOTE: Jacqueline and Eugene will be presenting remotely. The workshop will be facilitated in-person at School of Data by Ariel Kennan, Alyssa Dizon, Cara Eckholm and Brian Ho.
We will open up a Hangout at https://tinyurl.com/dtpr-qanda at the end of the session so that we can answer any questions. 

Speakers
avatar for Jacqueline Lu

Jacqueline Lu

Sidewalk Labs
AK

Ariel Kennan

Sidewalk Labs
PK

Patrick Keenan

Sidewalk Labs
EK

Eugene Kim

Sidewalk Labs


Saturday March 7, 2020 1:45pm - 2:45pm EST
3-114 - (48 ppl)

1:45pm EST

Effective use of Demographic Information
While they can provide useful insights, demographic information (i.e., race, gender, income) has an unfortunate history of being poorly utilized in research and analytics. The results of this misuse can have unseen yet grave consequences for the vulnerable populations whom said data is collected on.

This workshop will discuss the ways in which an over-reliance on demographic information can inhibit in-depth examinations of existing data at the expense of more effective and interesting research questions. We will critically examine how demographic information is measured, discuss more productive means of assessing individual characteristics, and weigh the risks and benefits of including demographics information in analyses.

In an effort to leave attendees empowered to apply this knowledge to their own work, we will walk through real world examples of implementing these practices in organizations, especially by those with limited decision making abilities. Finally, we will engage in a brief practical exercise in which we will abandon the use of demographic information and generate more fruitful research questions from a sample dataset.

Speakers
avatar for Mona Khalil

Mona Khalil

Data Scientist, Greenhouse Software
avatar for Devin Johnson

Devin Johnson

PhD Student, McMaster University



Saturday March 7, 2020 1:45pm - 2:45pm EST
1-204 - (24 ppl)

1:45pm EST

History of Civic Tech, an interactive session
This session is for people who want to get a basic working definition of civic tech and understand how it has evolved since its origins roughly 20 years ago. We will cover where civic tech came from, what enabled its rise, key pioneers and institution builders, and close with an overview of the three main phases of civic tech's development. We'll be drawing on the Civic Tech Field Guide and its 25-year timeline. The presentation will include some interactivity ("what was your first use of tech to do something civic?" "what do core civic tools enable?") and a list of resources for further learning.

Moderators
avatar for Micah Sifry

Micah Sifry

President and co-founder, Civic Hall

Saturday March 7, 2020 1:45pm - 2:45pm EST
3-302 - (60 ppl)

1:45pm EST

Transparency of the County Committee
ccsunlight.org has collected, digitized, and made available the membership of New York City's county committee system with the help of many local activists and citizens over the past 3 years. Attendees will learn about what county committee is, how it's relevant to them, and how local organizers are using open data to get a seat at the table.


Speakers
avatar for Jonathan Crockett

Jonathan Crockett

Co-Founder, County Committee Sunlight Project
A software engineer by trade and passionate about citizen engagement, with the help of many dedicated citizens over the past four years, Jonathan co-founded CCSunlight.org to shed light on the county committee system in NY. Other projects Jonathan has been involved in include LetNYVote.org... Read More →
IA

Isaac Anderson

New Kings Democrats
avatar for Angela LaScala-Gruenewald

Angela LaScala-Gruenewald

Field Director, Jesse Pierce for District Leader


Saturday March 7, 2020 1:45pm - 2:45pm EST
2-113 - (14 ppl)

1:45pm EST

Improving NYC parking violations dataset
An update on an ongoing project with NYC Parking Violations dataset. I have geocoded over 80% of the dataset. This talk would provide background on data quality issues and how to resolve them. I would also like to reach out to the community for suggestions on how to enhance the data sets and make them more usable. i hope to make this data available on the Data.Beta.NYC portal in advance of the event.

Speakers

Saturday March 7, 2020 1:45pm - 2:45pm EST
2-119 - (30 ppl)

3:00pm EST

Demo of the Hazard History & Consequence Tool and Office Hour with NYCEM data managers
The Hazard History & Consequence Tool is a database of historic hazard events and associated consequences that impacted New York City. It serves as a central repository of when, where, and what happened in the city during past events, and helps provide a local detail on the impacts of these events. We will demonstrate this tool, describe how it was created, and provide data samples for participants to work with. We would like to hear from the audience about suggestions and use cases for the tool and associated datasets. We are also available to answer general questions about NYCEM’s data.

Speakers
SR

Shraddha Ramani

NYC Emergency Management
MA

Mohamed Amin

NYC Emergency Management


Saturday March 7, 2020 3:00pm - 4:00pm EST
3-301 - (60 ppl)

3:00pm EST

Harnessing Collaboration and Open Data to Tackle Earth’s Challenges
The Opportunity Project is a program which engages government, communities, and the technology industry to create digital tools that address our greatest challenges as a nation. This process helps to empower people with technology, make government open data more accessible and user-friendly, and facilitate cross-sector collaboration to build new digital solutions with open data. In this session, Radhika Bhatt, Deputy Director of The Opportunity Project, will utilize design thinking methods to lead participants through collaborative activities that focus on using data to tackle environmental challenges relevant to New York City. This will be a participatory workshop where attendees will work together to identify community challenges and the people and data needed to help solve them. Attendees will leave the workshop with local challenges identified, and will be equipped with collaborators, data, and an action plan to move into problem solving with their communities.

Speaker Bio:
Radhika Bhatt is a civic technologist and community organizer with a career focusing on design, innovation, and open data. As Deputy Director of The Opportunity Project (TOP) at the Census Open Innovation Labs, she manages TOP’s 12-week sprints, leads engagement with companies, universities, and civic tech organizations, and facilitates design thinking workshops with TOP participants. Radhika is passionate about using human centered design to improve cross-sector collaboration, innovate on how open data is utilized, and grow engagement between technologists and the government.

Prior to this, Radhika worked at Fjord Design Studio at Accenture and utilized service design skills to facilitate workshops with Federal employees to identify problems, ideas, and solutions to resolve agency-wide challenges. Additionally, she worked with the Commerce Data Service designing websites to make Department of Commerce data more accessible to the public.

Radhika recently spent a year in India volunteering with various communities for the goal of language immersion, and is fluent in Gujarati. She is heavily involved in the DC tech community as a mentor and creative organizer, and is a 2-time winner of the DCFemTech Powerful Woman in Design award.


Speakers
RB

Radhika Bhatt

U.S. Census Bureau


Saturday March 7, 2020 3:00pm - 4:00pm EST
3-302 - (60 ppl)

3:00pm EST

It’s Crunch Time: Using Hard Data to Support Bicycle Network Development
Data is great! So how does the NYC Department of Transportation’s Bicycle Unit get it? Speakers in this session will provide a ground up review of how they get the numbers that get results. Dig into the weeds about how to access hard data, including setting up count programs, and learn more about what data is available on NYC OpenData. Emerge with a stronger understanding of how to collect and crunch the numbers and feel empowered to help build a movement that is creating safer streets for all road users.

Speakers
AK

Amber Knee

Project Manager, Bicycle and Greenways Program, NYC Department of Transportation
PK

Patrick Kennedy

NYC Department of Transportation
PR

Paula Rubira

NYC Department of Transportation


Saturday March 7, 2020 3:00pm - 4:00pm EST
2-119 - (30 ppl)

3:00pm EST

Teaching Civics and Data — Making open data and data science meaningful for students
Over the past two years, we've been learning more and more about how to introduce beginners into this field, specifically which barriers are real and which are imagined.

Upperline Code has co-designed two courses designed foster a love of data science among students who are just starting to explore this field:
  • CS and the City, in collaboration with the NYC DOE and BetaNYC: In this course, students to see how they can use front-end tools like React.js to present their findings about the city they live in and advocate for change based on the conclusions they draw. Bayside teacher Renne Castro will present some student artifacts.
  • Data Science 1, in collaboration with Women in Tech New York (WiTNY) and Google: In this course, students use Python, Pandas, SciKit, and Keras to do exploratory data analysis, predictive analysis, create visualizations, and train some basic machine learning models. Students Yessenia Guerrero and Sundus Khan will present their final project from this two-week course. 
Presentation available at bit.ly/csandthecityslides

Speakers
avatar for Renne Castro

Renne Castro

Teacher / Director, NYC Schools
Renne has taught computer science at Bayside High School since 2002 where he transformed a modest offering of Microsoft Applications and Introduction to Computer Science using Visual Basic 6 to a four year sequence of study in computer science. Students start with an appreciation... Read More →
avatar for Jeff Olson

Jeff Olson

Director of Curriculum & Instruction, Upperline Code
Jeff began his career as in 2011, as an English teacher in Phoenix, Arizona with Teach For America, and earned his M.Ed. in secondary education from Arizona State University. Jeff taught in public high schools for five years before transitioning to work full-time as a curriculum developer... Read More →


Saturday March 7, 2020 3:00pm - 4:00pm EST
3-114 - (48 ppl)

3:00pm EST

NYCDB, what is it and how to use it, by Housing Data Coalition
NYCDB is an open-source project of the Housing Data Coalition intended to make it easier for housing justice advocates to fight displacement in New York City.

Through this interactive workshop, you'll learn about the basics of NYC's housing-related open data by asking questions of NYCDB. You'll learn what a BBL (Borough-Block-Lot) is, and how to query NYCDB using a language called SQL. You'll also learn how to use other tools that build on NYCDB, like Who Owns What and the Displacement Alert Project (DAP) to aid you in housing research. At the end of the day, you'll have completed a NYC Housing Data Treasure Hunt and will have a better understanding of NYC's Open Data landscape.

No prior experience with open data or databases is required to attend this session.

Note: if there’s enough interest, we could actually split this session into two tracks, one of which is the workshop described above. The second track would involve contributing to the NYCDB open-source ETL tool itself and would require competency with Python, SQL, and the command-line.

Speakers
AV

Atul Varma

Lead Engineer and Tinkerer, JustFix.nyc
avatar for Maxwell Austensen

Maxwell Austensen

Housing Data Coalition
I'm a member of the Steering Committee for the NYC Housing Data Coalition. I am also the Data Manager for NYU Furman Center. Pronouns: He/Him
avatar for Noelle Francois

Noelle Francois

Founder, Heat Seek
SR

Sam Raby

Data Lead & Engineer, JustFix.nyc


Saturday March 7, 2020 3:00pm - 4:00pm EST
1-204 - (24 ppl)

3:00pm EST

Open Data for All by All - a working session around data.beta.nyc
Subtitle: A proposal to co-create an Open Source Data Management Platform to help prepare for the next decade of Open Data

New York City has been on the forefront of the Open Data revolution, pioneering several innovations to advance Open Data as an integral part of its digital infrastructure in the first decade of Open Data.

To mention a few - passing one of the first municipal Open Data Laws, creating the Mayor's Office of Data Analytics, creating the Chief Technology Officer position, supporting various programs like NYCBigApps and the Open Data Advisory Council, etc. all supported by a vibrant civictech ecosystem with pillars like BetaNYC, CivicHall, and numerous other good government organizations, foundations and corporations.

As it starts on its second decade of continued Open Data innovation, NYC continues to build on this solid foundation.

In its 2019 Open Data Annual report, the City shared its Strategic Plan to prepare for the Next Decade of Open Data.

One of the key initiatives in this Strategic Plan is to "explore an open source platform that allows for continuous design, development, piloting, and implementation of new features—while ensuring equitable access to the underlying code for this public service."

In this presentation, Joel Natividad shares lessons learned over the last decade helping several dozen governments in the US with their Open Data platforms - starting with his first NYCBigApps win in 2010, parlaying that into co-founding a civictech startup that was supported by the City, being acquired by a Silicon Valley govtech firm, and joining a professional services helping the US federal government with its multi-tenant CKAN platform.

Joel also demoes the revitalized BetaNYC data portal that applies some of these lessons towards creating a viable community data commons, and how it can be harmonized with other community projects like NYCDB.

The session ends with a call for co-creation for the community to continue iterating on the platform.

Speakers
avatar for Joel Natividad

Joel Natividad

Co-founder, datHere


Saturday March 7, 2020 3:00pm - 4:00pm EST
2-118 - (14 ppl)

3:00pm EST

Open Data + High School Selection / Workshop
New York City offers a wide range of high school choices. With more than 700 programs at over 400 high schools, selecting and ranking up to 12 schools for our son’s high school application has been a daunting task for our family. Fortunately, New York City offers extensive data on all schools and programs on its Open Data portal. Using the right tools and search techniques, this information can be of tremendous help, allowing students and their parents to quickly narrow down the number of choices. One effective search technique, that can help in this scenario, is referred to us faceted search, or faceted navigation. Faceted search is often encountered on commercial Web sites and data catalogues and provides an intuitive method to efficiently narrow a set of data to the precise desired subset. In this session we'll look at the high school data available on New York City's Open Data portal, discuss the various attributes that students may want to consider when making their choice and then we do a live demonstration of how to build a fully functional web-based faceted search application on New York City high school data in just minutes, using Oracle's Low Code development platform APEX, running on the Oracle Autonomous Database Cloud Service.

Speakers
MS

Marc Sewtz

Senior Software Development Manager, Oracle


Saturday March 7, 2020 3:00pm - 4:00pm EST
2-117 - (14 ppl)

3:00pm EST

Unintended consequences - hunting for monsters in open data
In this workshop we will use the metaphorical figure of the monster to help participants question potentially dangerous assumptions about the provenance and validity of data, and identify areas of potential future concern caused by uncertainty and ambiguity. This questioning helps demystify the under reported work that underlies data (such as data gathering and cleaning), and encourages participants to think and act critically with regard to technology. The session is informative, instructive, and interactive. It lasts 1 hour and is divided into three stages:

1) Why monsters? (15 minutes)
To start the workshop we reintroduce participants to the figure of the monster to show its original purpose was to act as a warning, particularly with regard to the unknown. We use familiar examples from popular culture, and historic examples from across the world, to show how the monster can be more complex and ambiguous than is typically understood today. We use the example of Dr. Frankenstein, and the creature he creates, to highlight the need for designers and developers of new technology to proceed intentionally and with care for their creations.
2) How to find monsters: (15 minutes)
In the second stage, participants are introduced to the 5WsH technique for creatively probing a topic, and to the specially designed hexagonal worksheets we use for identifying places where monsters might lurk. The 5WsH technique teaches participants to pose Who, What, Why, Where, When, and How questions about a topic. The hexagonal worksheet allows us to approach these questions in any order, without privileging any particular one. Where there is uncertainty, or the answer to a question is unknown, we mark a potential monster hiding place.
3) Practical monster hunt: (30 minutes)
In the final stage of the workshop we ask participants to hunt for monsters themselves. Using an example data set, for example NYC 311 open data, we ask participants to:
a. Come up with a set of 5WsH questions that will probe the provenance and validity of the data, e.g. by considering How, by Who, and for What purpose the data were gathered.
b. Pose the questions they come up with to the data set
c. Identify the warning signs of uncertainty and ambiguity at the places where assumptions are being made, and so from where monsters might emerge
d. Consider how the monster might be domesticated, problems mitigated, and uncertainty reduced.

Speakers
avatar for Graham Dove

Graham Dove

Research Assistant Professor, NYU's Tandon School of Engineering
I am a design focused Human-Computer Interaction researcher with a focus on participatory approaches to working with machine learning, and personal or open data
AF

Anne-Laure Fayard

New York University


Saturday March 7, 2020 3:00pm - 4:00pm EST
2-113 - (14 ppl)

4:15pm EST

Collecting and Mapping NYC Contracted Social Service Sites - Usability Workshop
At the Mayor's Office for Economic Opportunity, the Enterprise Data Solutions team is working on a project to collect verified service delivery locations for contracted social services. These services are funded through NYC government contracts, but are delivered by non-profits or other outside providers. The goal of this project is to compile and make public the sites where these services are delivered. Currently, service delivery location information is not consistently collected in any city-wide process. You can find information on this project here (https://www1.nyc.gov/site/opportunity/portfolio/social-service-location.page).

During the first iteration of the project, which took place in 2018, data from 6 city agencies were included. This data is available on NYC Open Data. The second iteration involves expanding this data collection to all health and human services agency partners using a web application to standardize data entry. We are hopeful that agencies will start entering data in early 2020.

Come learn about our process of collecting (through spreadsheets and a web app) and mapping (with geopandas and Tableau) these sites. Then help us brainstorm research questions, products, and other uses of this data!

Speakers
AS

Adam Santos

Mayor's Office for Economic Opportunity
MN

Martha Norrick

Mayor's Office for Economic Opportunity
SL

Sujin Lee

NYC Mayor's Office for Economic Opportunity


Saturday March 7, 2020 4:15pm - 5:15pm EST
3-114 - (48 ppl)

4:15pm EST

How to build databases "with not for" — CBDB overview
The "build with not for" philosophy has been spreading through the civic tech community for quite some time, but this philosophy tends to focus on UX design and interfaces.

This workshop will show how people can use DIY database technologies like Airtable to "build with not for" in the area of data structures.

Devin will explain how this philosophy has been applied through BetaNYC's Community Board Database (CBDB) project and how it can be used by civil servants to build custom data management systems from the bottom up and in a way that minimized institutional resistance to change.

Speakers
DB

Devin Balkind

WeGov.NYC
Devin works at the intersection of the nonprofit sector, the free/libre/open-source (FLO) movement, and grassroots community organizing initiatives to help each benefit from the best practices of the others. He currently serves the president of the Sahana Software Foundation, a nonprofit... Read More →


Saturday March 7, 2020 4:15pm - 5:15pm EST
1-204 - (24 ppl)

4:15pm EST

Merging Psychology and Consulting Frameworks: A Guide for Practical Data Solving
Everyone is a stakeholder in the data game, whether you’re the owner of a local bodega, or the CEO of a Fortune 500 company. But finding data insights that push your organization to the next level can sometimes feel like trying to find a needle in a haystack — having to string along the right balance of technical analysis, data assets, and effective communication. This session will guide the audience through a case study to help dismantle these roadblocks by focusing on the intersectionality between psychology and consulting frameworks that merge technical and creative approaches on how to identify relevant data tools, formulate impactful questions, and present findings using data visualization and design principles.

Speakers
avatar for Phuong Nguyen

Phuong Nguyen

Founder, Partners in Company
Data storytelling
avatar for Kamal Abdelrahman

Kamal Abdelrahman

Hey there! As a former artist turned data enthusiast, it's all about painting pictures with numbers.


Saturday March 7, 2020 4:15pm - 5:15pm EST
1-205 - (42 ppl)

4:15pm EST

Spreading civic tech and open gov beyond the big city, a workshop with Sunlight Foundation and Code for America
Over the past decade, we’ve seen more and more local governments explore and embrace open government and civic technology. Yet, most of these examples are from medium-to-large city governments. Small local governments don’t seem to be as much of a part of the conversation, and may have less capacity or ability to do some of the things larger governments can.

In this session we will discuss how the 2020s can be the decade where we change that.

This issue is particularly salient because it affects so many people. About 46% of Americans live in municipalities with a population under 300,000, according to the Census Bureau.

This session will include a brief presentation followed by an interactive workshop with lively discussions of:
  • How might large city governments help smaller local governments?
  • Where are there good opportunities for regional and statewide collaboration?
  • Are there ways in which small governments may have advantages in terms of nimbleness, speed of execution, and ability to experiment?
  • How can smaller places develop a civic-tech community?

This session will be designed for a wide range of people, including government employees, community advocates, and civic hackers. Attendees will leave with ideas that they can take back to their communities, regardless of size — and inspiration for spreading civic tech and open government to smaller communities in the decade ahead.

(This session has jointly been developed by Greg Jordan-Detamore from the Sunlight Foundation and Tom Dooner from Code for America.)

Speakers
TD

Tom Dooner

Code for America
avatar for Greg Jordan-Detamore

Greg Jordan-Detamore

Sunlight Foundation


Saturday March 7, 2020 4:15pm - 5:15pm EST
3-301 - (60 ppl)

4:15pm EST

Using Open Data to Accelerate Data Literacy Learning
After five years and hundreds of classes delivered to NYC employees, our instructors have refined an approach to data literacy education that is engaging, informative, and- dare we say- fun! We use NYC’s open data as a cornerstone of the classes, creating an inquiry-based approach to solving complex issues that affect all New Yorkers. As the classes unfold, we strategically infuse data analysis skills in platforms such as Microsoft Excel, R, Python, QGIS, and SQL. By the end of each class, students walk away with enhanced data analysis skills; an increased awareness of the city, state, federal, and global data available; and a larger network of fellow NYC employees.

Curious to learn more about our approach or how you can get involved? Join us for this 60-minute workshop where we will explore what we do, how we do it, and then walk you through the analytical process for our own complex question.

Speakers
ES

Elana Shneyer

President, Elana Shneyer Strategies
avatar for Elizabeth DiLuzio

Elizabeth DiLuzio

Evaluation + Learning Consulting


Saturday March 7, 2020 4:15pm - 5:15pm EST
3-302 - (60 ppl)

4:15pm EST

Workshop - Into to Qri
Ever wish you could track changes down to the cell in NYC Open Data? Well now you can! In this workshop we’ll use Qri, a free & open source tool, to do just that. We’ll work with attendees to explore NYC open data, add versions that clean & customize data for your own use, add your own documentation & notes, review changes from version to version, and publish your refined dataset for others to see & use. The value you add to an NYC open dataset can now be shared with the wider community, facilitating community collaborations to improve the entire environment of NYC Open data.

From there we’ll provide attendees with copy-and-paste code examples that automate dataset updating. Attendees need not know how to program to get a lot of value out of this workshop.

Speakers
avatar for Brendan O'Brien

Brendan O'Brien

caretaker, Qri
Brendan is a leader in the open source software development community and open data movement. He founded Qri (pronounced “query”) to help bring the benefits of open source software to public data. He helped to launch DataTogether.org, a network of communities, data scientists... Read More →
avatar for Chris Whong

Chris Whong

Outreach Engineer, Qri
At Qri, Chris does everything from engaging our base of peers and devs, to writing code and helping us plan and execute our next phases of growth.Chris is a leader in the NYC civic tech community, known for promoting government adoption of open-source tech, and supporting collaboration... Read More →


Saturday March 7, 2020 4:15pm - 5:15pm EST
2-119 - (30 ppl)

4:15pm EST

Staying Warm on a Hotter Planet: An Introduction to Building Energy Data & NYC’s Pathway to Carbon Neutrality
This session is for anyone who likes data, is curious about NYC's plan to address climate change, and prefers their surroundings to be around 68-73°F. Buildings produce about two-thirds of greenhouse gas emissions in NYC. The largest contributor to these emissions comes from heating spaces and water. Together, we will visualize building energy data in order to better understand different climate solutions and the positive actions we can take.

Speakers
MH

Melissa Hsiung

ClimateAction.tech
GH

Genevieve Hoffman

New York University


Saturday March 7, 2020 4:15pm - 5:15pm EST
2-116 - (30 ppl)

4:15pm EST

Hands on workshop - R + Election Data, learn to create a walk sheet for every election district in the county
Every political campaign, no matter how big or small, needs walk sheets to guide canvassers during door-knocking and petitioning.  Larger political campaigns have the resources to purchase cleaned voter files and pay for apps to create bespoke walk sheets.  Smaller campaigns use public data (the raw voter file from the Board of Elections) to create walk sheets. Brooklyn has over 2 million voters and 1,800 election districts, so it is especially time-consuming.  In this workshop, we’ll walk you through our open source R script to create a walk sheet for every election district in the county for the Rep Your Block campaign in Brooklyn.   


Rep Your Block
The Brooklyn Democratic County Committee is the most local level of Democratic party governance. The County Committee’s duties include choosing local judicial candidates, choosing the Democratic nominee in special elections (1 in 3 current New York State legislators were elected via a special election), and creating the Democratic party platform, among other things. There are roughly 5,000 members in the committee, but unfortunately, many of these seats lie vacant. The RepYourBlock campaign was created in an effort to organize Brooklynites interested in participating in the party and to support candidates running for County Committee by providing the funds and resources necessary to complete the campaign process.


In this workshop we’ll cover: 
  • What’s in the raw voter file
  • The process for correcting some of the many misspelled street names and other idiosyncrasies of the Brooklyn voter file
  • Ordering the sheets in an approximation of how a canvasser might walk the streets
  • Highlighting recently active voters for each district
  • Creating maps of each election district using shapefiles from NYC open data
  • Creating the file structure and writing out the maps and walk sheets formatted for print and digital
  • Making the ED walk sheets accessible to the correct canvasser
Along the way, we’ll discuss the privacy concerns of working with the BOE voter file, lessons learned, and how we would have done it differently if we had more time.  We’ll talk about how to fork the script on github and generalize it for other counties in New York or beyond.  Finally, we’ll turn it over to participants to brainstorm ways to improve the script, point out things we missed, and maybe even start improving it.
This will be a hands-on workshop, so experience with R, and a laptop with R installed will make this workshop especially worthwhile.  Beginners welcome!  We’ll discuss many topics outside of R along the way so non R-users are also welcome.



Speakers
SH

Sara Hodges

Director of Data and Visualization, EdBuild


Saturday March 7, 2020 4:15pm - 5:15pm EST
2-113 - (14 ppl)

4:15pm EST

A new way to build apps with open data - an introduction to Signalpattern™
An interactive talk/workshop (anyone with a cell phone - smart or non-smart - tablet or laptop can participate) that proposes to empower NYC civic innovators and residents to create and share curated collections (“playlists”) of interesting data points and interactions for the NYC OpenData portal, with the goal of raising awareness, encouraging diverse community engagement and providing tangible social value from this important informational resource. Come get introduced to a public, free, web-based tool that help you learn NYC open data --> signalpattern.com.

Workshop
The proposal envisions a 30-minute presentation followed by a 30-minute, full-audience-interactive session where everyone will learn how to use Signalpattern to search, use and share “playlists” and/or specific playlist items using live NYC OpenData APIs. This section could easily be longer and more in-depth if participants desire it and the time/room is available. Participants will leave with everything they need to continue building, sharing and using the “playlists” we create in the workshop.

Speakers
avatar for Peter Semmelhack

Peter Semmelhack

CEO, Bug Labs
Peter Semmelhack is the founder and CEO of Bug Labs, which develops open source web services platforms for IoT. Peter authored Social Machines, and as a founding member of the rapidly growing open source hardware movement, and he is a frequent speaker at events around the... Read More →
VK

Vishal Kumar

Director of Engineering, Bug Labs


Saturday March 7, 2020 4:15pm - 5:15pm EST
2-115 - (14 ppl)